How to utilise a gig – Project 2: Rip and replace the router

RouterGraphics

The second thing you do after you get used to the sheer speed of a gig symmetric service is start to wonder why you can only hit 850/900 mbit regularly on most speed tests.  Shortly after that you wonder why you struggle to max out a torrent beyond 30meg/sec.  This was the strange set of events that led me to do a bit of a deep dive and find an unexpected gem.

So yeah, I went from 15-> 820meg speed tests, and yet the geek in me wondered, where had those other 180 meg gone?  Now, I give you that at these speeds its a purely theoretical, intellectual exercise, but nonetheless where had that missing 20percent gone.  Research quickly finds that around about 900 meg is realistic with overhead on any gig service, so we’re hunting 80-100 meg.  A bit of fishing around reveals that the slow torrent speeds are likely as a result of a router that can’t handle the number of connections, that and the fact that most soho routers (ZTE in the case of Hyperoptic) just can’t give you full line speed, port to port all the time.  One of the nice things about the Hyoperoptic service is the fact that it’s basically a RJ-45 jack with DHCP.  Plug in any router and it will come up. So which router?  After several reads on forums, I went for a Ubiquiti Networks ER3-Lite, I’ve loved Vyatta long before it was purchased by Brocade, and the reviews of hardware professed it’s ultra high speed, with low overhead, indeed you can offload most of the processing to it’s DSPs.

300px-Edgerouter-original-packageI picked mine up at amazon ( link to amazon.co.uk for ER3-Lite) at under £70.  Out the box it’s a pretty sturdy wee beast.  Once I’d ordered I started googling, and found two fantastic videos on setup , the best one is probably this one .

The device is pretty simple to setup if you understand networking in anyway, plug a cable into the eth0 port, you’ll get a dynamic IP (if not just set your ip in the 192.168.1.0/24 range) then http to the routers IP: 192.168.1.1.   Once in run the setup assistant (shown in the video) there’s various different ways to configure the 3 network ports on the device.  I went for WAN+2LAN, this makes eth0 the LAN1, eth1 the WAN and eth2 the WAN2.  I have a subnet for my lab so will eventually use this segregation to router VPN traffic in.

Performance once configured is pretty breathtaking.  I only tweaked the MTU on the LAN  port (eth0) as my home switch supports Jumbo Frames:

Heres a wee graphic of it doing a quick 861, though I can regularly burst 920-970 depending on time of day and location of end server.  In short- buy it!

output

Leave a Reply